Emergency Preparedness - Expect the Unexpected

Emergency Preparedness - Expect the Unexpected

Do you have an emergency kit ready for your pet? In Michigan, we aren't usually blasted with violent weather patterns, but we should still be prepared in case of an emergency. We never know when we may actually need to evacuate our home and we never want to leave our pets behind. If your pets are like mine, they are an integral part of the family and have become your fur-kids.

Do you have an emergency kit ready for your pet? In Michigan, we aren't usually blasted with violent weather patterns, but we should still be prepared in case of an emergency. We never know when we may actually need to evacuate our home and we never want to leave our pets behind. If your pets are like mine, they are an integral part of the family and have become your fur-kids.  

Where do you begin?

A good first step is determining what you need. You can begin by collecting items within your home and putting them in a container together. If you already have a supply tote with remedies on standby for yourself, you can usually use many of the same items for your pets. As you begin, inventory the items to determine what you have and what you need. It is often recommended that you put your items in a backpack so if you have to leave by foot you can carry your items since a tote is much more difficult to carry. 

If you have a working dog, you can give them their own backpack to carry some of their supplies. If you feed your dog or cat a dry food, it might be worth having some dehydrated or freeze-dried food on hand. Or even picking up some samples that you can also rotate into your pet's diet to try to make sure your pet will eat prior to any life catastrophe. The benefits of freeze-dried or dehydrated food is that it takes up less space than kibble and it is more nutrient dense by calories per cup, which makes it a great travel companion. Just remember to replenish the supply about once a year.

Each human in the house should also have a backpack prepped and ready to leave at a moment’s notice. There are many websites that have emergency preparedness tips on how to get you and your household organized. To get you started, read this quick checklist of items you need to collect:

  •         Food – at least 7 days’ worth (or more if you can carry it)
  •         Water – at least 7 days’ worth (or more if you can carry it)
  •         Jacket and/or blanket (if needed)
  •         Disposable bags for waste clean up
  •         Dishes/Water bowls – you can find lightweight or collapsible bowls
  •         Collar + name tags
  •         Medical Records
  •         Medications if necessary
  •         Current/Recent photo in case you are separated
  •         Extra leash, toys, chews, beds, etc., if allowable and transportable
  •         Litter/litter pan – if  you have cats

What are natural remedies most important to pack?

March 2016 - Emergency Preparedness

Five Flower Remedy – This is also referred to as Rescue Remedy. I think in an emergency situation, we could all use some emotional support, both for the humans and animals. Five flower remedy is a blend of flower essences that allow us to calmly handle difficult situations as they arise and to do so with ease. This remedy can be used frequently in times of added stress or anxiety.

Lavender Essential Oil – This “universal essential oil” is good for many different aspects. It can be used on open wounds to relieve pain as well as to calm those who are hysterical. Some other properties of lavender include anti-infectious, antiseptic, anti-fungal, anti-tumor, antihistamine, anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial.

Cinnamon Essential Oil – Although this essential oil has a spicy note, it has the capabilities to rid water of pathogens that cause human gastrointestinal distress if there isn’t a way to purify water. Just a few drops in one gallon of water will do the job!

Aconite – This homeopathic’s main job is to help deal with the shock. When leaving your home in an emergency, it can be very shocking to family members. Many times in an emergency you don’t have much time to gather items.  Great anxiety and fear, combined with a “deer in the head lights” look, is a key indicator that this remedy is needed.

Phosphorus – This homeopathic is great for profuse bleeding either internally or externally. It can be used in cases of food poisoning or stomach upset such as vomiting after food is ingested. It can also be helpful for animals that have a tendency to be scared or anxious from thunderstorms or other loud noises.

Activated Charcoal – These capsules are great to have on hand in case of food poisoning or other noxious agents. It binds to toxins within the entire intestinal tract, including the stomach, and is able to help eliminate them from the body. You can also use it topically as a poultice on the skin to draw venom out of bites.

Silver Shield – This is the “everything” replacement! This odorless, tasteless liquid is great to always have on hand for everyone in the household to use. It can help with just about every scenario, both internally and externally. Silver shield has antibacterial, anti-fungal, antimicrobial, antiparasitic and antiviral benefits, eases food poisoning and acts as a digestive aid, immune stimulant, antiseptic, and disinfectant. Make sure this is packed in your emergency kit!

Additional Recommendations

Celtic Sea Salt – Having some Celtic sea salt packed can be very helpful in cases of dehydration. This type of sea salt contains 82 trace minerals that are needed by the body. It can also be helpful with muscle cramps are associated with electrolyte imbalances.1

Magnets – A 200 gauss magnet is simple and can be of great benefit in reducing pain or stopping the bleeding. It can even help one feel grounded if there is a situation where there is a lot of chaos happening around you.

Water Purifying Equipment – You should still have some bottled water in your pack to carry in case you leave in a rush and won’t be near water. It is great to also have a lightweight purifying system packed and ready to go. These range in price from $100 to $500 depending on the system. Platypus and Berkey have easy gravity fed systems that are quick, easy to use, and lightweight.

Do you have a plan in place?

If you haven’t thought about it before, it is best to have a plan in place for all family members. Where are you going to meet? Where is your safe place? Again, it is better to have this pre-planned rather than trying to do so when you need to evacuate and may not be able to communicate with loved ones. If you have family members or a community of friends that would like to prepare together, it is best to have meetings regularly to keep everyone up to speed in case your plan changes or needs to be adjusted. You can then determine skill sets and how each of you can help one another in a time of need.

Preparation is key. If you're ready to get started, a timeline determining when to purchase items, pack and come up with a plan is a great idea to help you feel prepped and avoid feeling overwhelmed. We may never know when an emergency will strike, but there is comfort in knowing we are prepared.

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