Turkey, Turkey, Everywhere!

Turkey, Turkey, Everywhere!

Turkey! It's everywhere we turn on Thanksgiving Day. And although there are a few safety tips that you should be aware of, turkey and certain Thanksgiving side dishes can be safe options when done right.

Turkey! It's everywhere we turn on Thanksgiving Day. And although there are a few safety tips that you should be aware of, turkey and certain Thanksgiving side dishes can be safe options when done right!
 

Keep One Eye Open

While you're in your post-dinner turkey haze, keep one eye on any turkey remains disposed of in the trash. While tempting for your pet, the cooked carcass causes concern mainly because­, as most of us know, the cooked bones do not digest in our pet’s digestive system and can penetrate or puncture the intestinal wall. When poultry bones have been cooked, their chemical makeup also changes, making them no longer pliable cartilage but sharp daggers ready to do harm.
 

Giblet Goodness

If you want to give your pet part of the turkey, dig those giblets out of the carcass before cooking it and feed the heart and gizzard raw to your cat or dog. If size appropriate, you could also give your dog the raw turkey neck if it won’t be sacrificed for the gravy. You also need to understand that if your pet has never had raw before, you may only want to give them a small piece of the neck and put the rest in the fridge to use as treat nuggets over the next few days.

Pets do not need the meat cooked in order to digest it. From personal experience, I found that most pets don’t do well with cooked turkey from our Thanksgiving meals. Most families that cook a Thanksgiving dinner like to baste their turkey with butter and oils that can upset our pets stomach because they aren’t used to the added condiments. The cooked skin can be of concern to those pets that may have sensitivities and the extra fat could throw them into a pancreatitis attack.

Do's and Don'ts for Safe Sides

Besides the turkey, there are some other food items on the menu that should be kept away from pets. Many desserts that contain chocolate, any dish that contains onions, cooked bones, alcohol, and macadamia nuts should be avoided. Especially keep an eye on family members who may be consuming alcohol and think it’s a festive idea to let Fido try it. Alcohol is not good for our pets. With sensitive animals, it can induce seizure activity.

Many of our healthy side dishes could be served to our pets in small portions if you wanted. Sweet potatoes are great for cats and dogs, but not casseroles that have been loaded with brown sugar. Cranberry and orange relish would be a nice topping for your pet’s dinner if they like tart fruits. A dollop of cottage cheese could also be an acceptable food topper to make them feel included in the holiday. A handful of blanched green beans set aside before making your green bean casserole would be a crunchy little treat. Be creative and avoid the fats or sugars.

Overall, be smart and make sure the turkey carcass ends up in a garbage receptacle with a closed lid, preferably out of your pet’s reach. If you want your pet to be included the holiday fun, plan ahead by stopping in for safe food or treat options that you can feed your pet during the holidays. We have plenty of turkey, cranberry, pumpkin and sweet potato products!

Have a blessed and safe Thanksgiving holiday.

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